The CFC

28 Nov 2012

grrlyman:

I cried for about 30 minutes today after watching the video of Lil Reese assaulting a woman while a room full of people, excepting one other woman, stood around and did nothing. It took me about 10 minutes to get through the video because it was so hard for me to watch. I, like so many people…

23 Sep 2012

farahjoon:

thepeoplesrecord:

Red shoes display protests violence against women in MexicoJuly 27, 2012
Mexican visual artist Elina Chauvet placed red shoes in front of the Mexican consulate today in El Paso as an artistic protest against violence against women in Juárez.
More than 200 shoes - from toddler boots to high heels - covered the sidewalk on the west end of the building, where people had lined up to conduct transactions at the consulate.
The ‘Zapatos Rojos’ (Red Shoes) art collective is a call to stand in solidarity with the escalating violence against women in Juárez,” said Chauvet, as she continued to place shoes on the ground. “This display is intended to give visibility to an issue that is no longer receiving the attention it merits. It’s also a way for anyone in the public to participate.”
Mexican officials said about 700 girls and women have been murdered in Juárez since 1993, with the numbers increasing since the drug cartel wars intensified four years ago. An uncertain number are missing.
Source

FOR THE RECORD, it’s called FEMINICIDE
FEMINICIDE has taken place on the border (i.e., El Paso and Ciudad Juárez) since 1992
NEVER BELIEVE THE DATES AND NUMBERS THEY GIVE YOU
EVERYONE IS IMPLICATED IN THIS
THOUSANDS OF WORKING-CLASS WOMEN OF COLOR HAVE DISAPPEARED
BUT NOBODY FUCKING CARES BECAUSE #NAFTA #ICE #GLOBALIZATION #SNUFF #MAINSTREAM MASS MEDIA #THE POLICE #THE STATE
LEARN MORE NOW
THIS IS SO FUCKING IMPORTANT, PLEASE TAKE A SECOND TO READ ABOUT THIS

farahjoon:

thepeoplesrecord:

Red shoes display protests violence against women in Mexico
July 27, 2012

Mexican visual artist Elina Chauvet placed red shoes in front of the Mexican consulate today in El Paso as an artistic protest against violence against women in Juárez.

More than 200 shoes - from toddler boots to high heels - covered the sidewalk on the west end of the building, where people had lined up to conduct transactions at the consulate.

The ‘Zapatos Rojos’ (Red Shoes) art collective is a call to stand in solidarity with the escalating violence against women in Juárez,” said Chauvet, as she continued to place shoes on the ground. “This display is intended to give visibility to an issue that is no longer receiving the attention it merits. It’s also a way for anyone in the public to participate.”

Mexican officials said about 700 girls and women have been murdered in Juárez since 1993, with the numbers increasing since the drug cartel wars intensified four years ago. An uncertain number are missing.

Source

FOR THE RECORD, it’s called FEMINICIDE

FEMINICIDE has taken place on the border (i.e., El Paso and Ciudad Juárez) since 1992

NEVER BELIEVE THE DATES AND NUMBERS THEY GIVE YOU

EVERYONE IS IMPLICATED IN THIS

THOUSANDS OF WORKING-CLASS WOMEN OF COLOR HAVE DISAPPEARED

BUT NOBODY FUCKING CARES BECAUSE #NAFTA #ICE #GLOBALIZATION #SNUFF #MAINSTREAM MASS MEDIA #THE POLICE #THE STATE

LEARN MORE NOW

THIS IS SO FUCKING IMPORTANT, PLEASE TAKE A SECOND TO READ ABOUT THIS

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

26 Jun 2012

mohandasgandhi:

humanrightswatch:

The US must stop sexual violence against immigrant farmworkers.
Hundreds of thousands of immigrant farmworker women and girls in the United States face a high risk of sexual violence and sexual harassment in their workplaces because US authorities and employers fail to protect them adequately.
In a new 95-page report, Human Rights Watch documents rape, stalking, unwanted touching, exhibitionism, or vulgar and obscene language by supervisors, employers, and others in positions of power. Most farmworkers interviewed said they had experienced such treatment or knew others who had. And most said they had not reported these or other workplace abuses, fearing reprisals. Those who had filed sexual harassment claims or reported sexual assault to the police had done so with the encouragement and assistance of survivor advocates or attorneys in the face of difficult challenges.
Farmworkers described experiences such as the following:
A woman in California reported that a supervisor at a lettuce company raped her and later told her that she “should remember it’s because of him that [she has] this job.”
A woman in New York said that a supervisor, when she picked potatoes and onions, would touch women’s breasts and buttocks. If they tried to resist, he would threaten to call immigration or fire them.
Four women who had worked together packing cauliflower in California said a supervisor would regularly expose himself and make comments like, “[That woman] needs to be fucked!” When they tried to defend one young woman whom he singled out for particular abuse, he fired all of them.
© 2011 AP Photo

This is important.

mohandasgandhi:

humanrightswatch:

The US must stop sexual violence against immigrant farmworkers.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrant farmworker women and girls in the United States face a high risk of sexual violence and sexual harassment in their workplaces because US authorities and employers fail to protect them adequately.

In a new 95-page report, Human Rights Watch documents rape, stalking, unwanted touching, exhibitionism, or vulgar and obscene language by supervisors, employers, and others in positions of power. Most farmworkers interviewed said they had experienced such treatment or knew others who had. And most said they had not reported these or other workplace abuses, fearing reprisals. Those who had filed sexual harassment claims or reported sexual assault to the police had done so with the encouragement and assistance of survivor advocates or attorneys in the face of difficult challenges.

Farmworkers described experiences such as the following:

  • A woman in California reported that a supervisor at a lettuce company raped her and later told her that she “should remember it’s because of him that [she has] this job.”
  • A woman in New York said that a supervisor, when she picked potatoes and onions, would touch women’s breasts and buttocks. If they tried to resist, he would threaten to call immigration or fire them.
  • Four women who had worked together packing cauliflower in California said a supervisor would regularly expose himself and make comments like, “[That woman] needs to be fucked!” When they tried to defend one young woman whom he singled out for particular abuse, he fired all of them.

© 2011 AP Photo

This is important.

28 Mar 2012

I recently attended the standing-room-only funeral for Deoni Jones. She was 23 years old, fatally stabbed while waiting at a bus stop in Washington, D.C. Police say they have no evidence that this particular stabbing was related to her gender identity. Regardless, she was one of too many transgender women violently killed.

Funerals are always hard. Funerals for someone murdered are a whole level of different. Anger. Fear. Disbelief. Did I mention anger? Anger that it’s not an isolated incident. Anger that for all the national LGBT organizations here in D.C. and all the advances our community has made, our people are still getting killed, right here, in 2012. Anger that we know it won’t be the last vigil or funeral we will attend for a murdered transgender woman of color.

In 2011 nine other transgender individuals were brutally killed in vicious hate crimes in the U.S.: Cassidy Nathan Vickers, shot in Hollywood, Calif.; Shelley Hilliard, shot in Detroit, Mich., her body burned; Gaurav Gopalan, killed in Washington, D.C.; Camila Guzman, stabbed in New York City; Lashai Mclean, shot in Washington, D.C.; Miss Nate Nate (or Née) Eugene Davis, shot in Houston, Tex.; Marcal Camero Tye, shot and dragged in Arkansas; Tyra Trent, strangled in Baltimore, Md.; Krissy Bates, shot multiple times in Minneapolis. This list is only those who did not survive their attacks. This list is just those in the U.S., in the last year.

In the labor movement, we organize by the spirit of the motto, “An injury to one is an injury to all.” In the LGBT community, we must find that sense of shared struggle with a movement that truly includes all of us. Our people are getting killed. Every one of us has a moral obligation to stand up and talk about it, to find a way to take action, to do more. Those of us who are the “LGB” of our community must stand in real solidarity with our transgender sisters and brothers. Allies, you are just as vital.

There is an inseparable link between violence, discrimination, and economic injustice. Working people across all sectors are facing extraordinary levels of unemployment and underemployment. Youth, immigrants, women, people of color, and LGBT people face disproportionate hardship. Black transgender individuals are estimated to have four times the unemployment rate of the general population.

When people are out of work or underemployed — and can be legally discriminated against in hiring, in most states — individuals are more likely to find themselves in vulnerable positions, in less safe work environments and less safe neighborhoods, and facing fewer options for living with basic human dignity. When people are out of work, struggling with keeping their homes, making the rent, keeping the lights on, the stress and weight of the world grows. And it’s not just LGBT folks; too many people are living in a state of suffering, whether physical or emotional. It takes a toll.

During Deoni’s funeral, as person after person shared their grief, frustration, disbelief, a beautiful thing happened: an overwhelming sense of community solidarity grew. A resolve to support each other, to use our voices, to stand together. To not wait for someone to fix it for us, but to be moved to action. As Pastor Darren Phelps said during the service, “We came to get hope, and to give hope.”

When we celebrate the lives of those lost, sisters like Deoni, we must each consider how we can honor their spirit by changing and strengthening our work. Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

We should not be hopeless, but we should be angry. There are actions that we can take:

  1. Speaking out against violence: We cannot let hate crimes against our community pass by in silence. In the words of the ACT-UP community, silence equals death. As an LGBT community, we must speak the women’s names aloud, remember them, take the pain of their murders, and use it as our fuel to go out and make it better.
  2. Educating within the LGBT community: In addition to the work of educating our allies, we must continue to educate within the LGBT community about issues of both gender identity/expression and racial justice. We must do the work to learn what we don’t know, and share what we do. We must have frank conversations and create meaningful action plans to make our work more whole.
  3. Withdrawing our dollars from corporations that don’t genuinely support LGBT workers: There’s a difference between saying the LGBT community supports people of color and transgender folks within our movement, and actually standing in support of their struggles. While the regular working people and jobless folks in the LGBT community may not have all that mythical gay community disposable income, we absolutely do have strength in numbers, and we should recognize and use our power.
  4. Fighting for good jobs and economic security:While we continue the fight for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, we must take action for economic relief that will have a meaningful, immediate impact in workers’ lives. LGBT groups must prioritize fighting for those in deepest struggle within our community. All of us in the LGBT community should be standing up for good jobs that let our community survive and thrive, living as our whole selves and supporting our families with dignity.

    That means taking on the fight to protect unemployment insurance as our own. That means standing in solidarity for workers’ right to form a union. In many states, the only protection LGBT workers have from being legally fired or discriminated against in hiring and promotions.

    Fighting for good union jobs is one of the strongest paths out of poverty. And fighting poverty — for all people, not just LGBT folks — is vital to stopping violence.

(Source: transfeminism)

25 Sep 2011

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

paradiscacorbasi:

 
Cop Arrests Disabled Woman for Sitting
 disabled Atlanta woman says she was sitting outside and waiting for the ice cream man when a cop showed up and ordered her to move. When she refused—because she wasn’t in anyone’s way, or doing anything wrong—the cop allegedly threw her to the ground. Then he bought her a medium-sized cone.
A 

Wait no, sorry: the officer—one Kenneth Thomas—did not buy his charge, 40-year-old Shequita Walker, any ice cream cones or other novelties, but instead arrested her for disorderly conduct. Apparently she was acting in a “disorderly” manner by being a disabled woman who was asserting her right to sit in a metal chair, in a vacant lot, with three other people while waiting for a frozen dessert. Her attitude, if gone unchecked, could have inspired other emboldened disabled ice cream lovers in Atlanta to stick it to The Man and, who knows, led to a riot or something. Thomas had to take swift action, as the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports:

Thomas…grabbed Walker’s wrist and twisted her arm, causing her to fall to the concrete, unable to get up on her own, Walker said…An ambulance was called to transport Walker to Grady Memorial Hospital, where she received treatment for a shoulder injury sustained when she hit the ground, Grossman said.

After her release from the hospital, Walker got to spend the night in jail—pretty much for no reason, because the charge against her was dropped. Oh, and because she didn’t do anything illegal.
A letter from the Atlanta Citizen Review Board, which examined Walker’s complaint, suggests that Thomas enjoys arresting people for disorderly conduct: 27 out of 38 arrests he made in a five-month period were for that very crime, in fact. This is “three times the amount made by two other officers that patrol the same area, during the same shift,” the AJC reports.
The APD hasn’t determined whether to discipline Thomas or pressure his colleagues to make more disorderly conduct arrests of disabled people with sweet teeth.

I’m sure this will be under “examination” and by that I mean some cops will “examining” it while laughing and throwing it in the trash.

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

paradiscacorbasi:

Cop Arrests Disabled Woman for Sitting

 disabled Atlanta woman says she was sitting outside and waiting for the ice cream man when a cop showed up and ordered her to move. When she refused—because she wasn’t in anyone’s way, or doing anything wrong—the cop allegedly threw her to the ground. Then he bought her a medium-sized cone.

Wait no, sorry: the officer—one Kenneth Thomas—did not buy his charge, 40-year-old Shequita Walker, any ice cream cones or other novelties, but instead arrested her for disorderly conduct. Apparently she was acting in a “disorderly” manner by being a disabled woman who was asserting her right to sit in a metal chair, in a vacant lot, with three other people while waiting for a frozen dessert. Her attitude, if gone unchecked, could have inspired other emboldened disabled ice cream lovers in Atlanta to stick it to The Man and, who knows, led to a riot or something. Thomas had to take swift action, as the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports:

Thomas…grabbed Walker’s wrist and twisted her arm, causing her to fall to the concrete, unable to get up on her own, Walker said…An ambulance was called to transport Walker to Grady Memorial Hospital, where she received treatment for a shoulder injury sustained when she hit the ground, Grossman said.

After her release from the hospital, Walker got to spend the night in jail—pretty much for no reason, because the charge against her was dropped. Oh, and because she didn’t do anything illegal.

A letter from the Atlanta Citizen Review Board, which examined Walker’s complaint, suggests that Thomas enjoys arresting people for disorderly conduct: 27 out of 38 arrests he made in a five-month period were for that very crime, in fact. This is “three times the amount made by two other officers that patrol the same area, during the same shift,” the AJC reports.

The APD hasn’t determined whether to discipline Thomas or pressure his colleagues to make more disorderly conduct arrests of disabled people with sweet teeth.


I’m sure this will be under “examination” and by that I mean some cops will “examining” it while laughing and throwing it in the trash.

(Source: skyliting)