The CFC

25 Mar 2013

trillle:

fyeahcuba:

Adela Hernández,  the first transgender woman to win office in Cuba

This month Adela made history by becoming the first known transgender person to hold public office in Cuba, winning rhw election as a delegate to the municipal government of Caibarien in the central province of Villa Clara.

Hernandez won office in early November by taking a runoff vote 280-170. Her position is the equivalent of a city councilor, and her election makes her eligible to be selected as a representative to Parliament in early 2013.

In a country where gays were persecuted for decades and sent to grueling work camps in the countryside, Hernandez, 48, hailed her election as yet another milestone in a gradual shift away from macho attitudes in the years since Fidel Castro himself expressed regret over the treatment of people perceived to be different.

‘‘As time evolves, homophobic people — although they will always exist — are the minority,’’ Hernandez said by phone from her hometown. 

oh fuck yeah.

21 Mar 2013

transpeoplespeak:

My name is Deigo Sanchez.

I AM a son,

I AM a Georgia Bulldog tennis letterman,

I AM a community leeader and activist,

AND I AM ALSO an openly female-to-male transsexual man.

17 Feb 2013

thepeoplesrecord:

The struggle for abortion rights in IrelandDecember 5, 2012
Abortion and the struggle for a woman’s right to choose is taking center stage on both sides of the Irish border, in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland.
The death of a young woman in the Republic of Ireland because she was denied an abortion brought thousands onto the streets in outrage—while in Northern Ireland, the opening of an abortion clinic in Belfast has challenged the conservative establishment consensus.
The debate is opening up a new front of struggle amid the ongoing repercussions of the collapse of the Irish economic boom, known internationally as the Celtic Tiger, as well as economic stagnation in Northern Ireland.
The economic meltdown has had a staggering impact on Irish politics and society. In the Republic of Ireland, Fianna Fail, the dominant party over the previous 70 years, was severely punished in the 2011 national elections. Austerity continues to widen inequality, deepen class polarization and fuel latent resistance. But resistance isn’t just developing for economic justice, but for social justice as well.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Sativa Halappanavar, a 31-year-old Indian immigrant and dentist, died on October 28 after doctors at Galway University Hospital refused to terminate her pregnancy. Savita and her husband Praveen, were told an abortion couldn’t be performed because Ireland is “a Catholic country.”
The India Times correctly characterized what happened with the headline: “Ireland Murders Pregnant Indian Dentist.” Thousands have taken to the streets to demonstrate their anger at this completely unnecessary tragedy and to demand new legislation so it never happens again.
Savita, who has been in Ireland with her husband since 2008, was informed by doctors on October 21 that she was miscarrying. She suffered days of agony and her appeals for a termination were turned down. On October 24, the fetal heartbeat could no longer be detected, and the fetus was removed. But Savita had to be taken to intensive care with multi-organ failure. She died on October 28 after contracting a blood infection.
This happened because the Republic of Ireland has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in Europe. Abortion remains illegal under the antiquated 1861 Offenses Against the Person Act. In 1992, Ireland’s High Court was pressured to rule that abortions could take place if there was a threat to the life of the mother and that women would have the right to travel abroad for the procedure.
The 1992 ruling came in response to a case in which a 14-year-old victim of rape was denied the right to have an abortion or travel elsewhere. Huge demonstrations and a massive public outcry forced the government to backtrack.
Some 3,000 women now travel from the Republic of Ireland to the United Kingdom or elsewhere for abortions every year. However, the cost of travel and arranging an abortion makes it much more difficult for working-class and poor women. While the Celtic boom made headlines in the financial press, provisions for maternity, parental leave and child benefits improved only marginally and lagged well behind the rest of the European Union of which the Republic of Ireland is a member state.
Child care costs in Ireland are among the highest in Europe, and one of the travesties of the Celtic Tiger boom was the government’s complete failure of to fund an expansion of widely needed public services.
The 1990s crystallized tremendous social and economic changes across Ireland, with divorce and homosexuality legalized. The transformation in consciousness in the Irish population accompanied a massive increase in female participation in the workforce. In 1961, 26.4 percent of women were part of the workforce in a total population of 2.8 million; in 2011, the employment rate for women was 56 percent. The gender pay gap is still 12.6 percent.
The majority of the population remains nominally Catholic, but there has been a huge decline in adherence to Catholic doctrine. For example, an Irish Times poll in September 2010 found that only 13 percent of respondents described themselves as “strongly religious,” and among those aged between 18 and 24, just 4 percent said they were “strongly religious.” Some 62 percent of urban residents said they attended religious services “only occasionally” or “never.”
On many defining issues, a majority of Irish Catholics don’t follow Church doctrine. Polls consistently show a majority of Irish people support abortion rights. The exposure of the Catholic Church’s tolerance of and defense of pedophiles in the 1990s also destroyed much of its moral authority. Overwhelming majorities support marriage for priests and the right for women to be priests.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

The struggle for abortion rights in Ireland
December 5, 2012

Abortion and the struggle for a woman’s right to choose is taking center stage on both sides of the Irish border, in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland.

The death of a young woman in the Republic of Ireland because she was denied an abortion brought thousands onto the streets in outrage—while in Northern Ireland, the opening of an abortion clinic in Belfast has challenged the conservative establishment consensus.

The debate is opening up a new front of struggle amid the ongoing repercussions of the collapse of the Irish economic boom, known internationally as the Celtic Tiger, as well as economic stagnation in Northern Ireland.

The economic meltdown has had a staggering impact on Irish politics and society. In the Republic of Ireland, Fianna Fail, the dominant party over the previous 70 years, was severely punished in the 2011 national elections. Austerity continues to widen inequality, deepen class polarization and fuel latent resistance. But resistance isn’t just developing for economic justice, but for social justice as well.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Sativa Halappanavar, a 31-year-old Indian immigrant and dentist, died on October 28 after doctors at Galway University Hospital refused to terminate her pregnancy. Savita and her husband Praveen, were told an abortion couldn’t be performed because Ireland is “a Catholic country.”

The India Times correctly characterized what happened with the headline: “Ireland Murders Pregnant Indian Dentist.” Thousands have taken to the streets to demonstrate their anger at this completely unnecessary tragedy and to demand new legislation so it never happens again.

Savita, who has been in Ireland with her husband since 2008, was informed by doctors on October 21 that she was miscarrying. She suffered days of agony and her appeals for a termination were turned down. On October 24, the fetal heartbeat could no longer be detected, and the fetus was removed. But Savita had to be taken to intensive care with multi-organ failure. She died on October 28 after contracting a blood infection.

This happened because the Republic of Ireland has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in Europe. Abortion remains illegal under the antiquated 1861 Offenses Against the Person Act. In 1992, Ireland’s High Court was pressured to rule that abortions could take place if there was a threat to the life of the mother and that women would have the right to travel abroad for the procedure.

The 1992 ruling came in response to a case in which a 14-year-old victim of rape was denied the right to have an abortion or travel elsewhere. Huge demonstrations and a massive public outcry forced the government to backtrack.

Some 3,000 women now travel from the Republic of Ireland to the United Kingdom or elsewhere for abortions every year. However, the cost of travel and arranging an abortion makes it much more difficult for working-class and poor women. While the Celtic boom made headlines in the financial press, provisions for maternity, parental leave and child benefits improved only marginally and lagged well behind the rest of the European Union of which the Republic of Ireland is a member state.

Child care costs in Ireland are among the highest in Europe, and one of the travesties of the Celtic Tiger boom was the government’s complete failure of to fund an expansion of widely needed public services.

The 1990s crystallized tremendous social and economic changes across Ireland, with divorce and homosexuality legalized. The transformation in consciousness in the Irish population accompanied a massive increase in female participation in the workforce. In 1961, 26.4 percent of women were part of the workforce in a total population of 2.8 million; in 2011, the employment rate for women was 56 percent. The gender pay gap is still 12.6 percent.

The majority of the population remains nominally Catholic, but there has been a huge decline in adherence to Catholic doctrine. For example, an Irish Times poll in September 2010 found that only 13 percent of respondents described themselves as “strongly religious,” and among those aged between 18 and 24, just 4 percent said they were “strongly religious.” Some 62 percent of urban residents said they attended religious services “only occasionally” or “never.”

On many defining issues, a majority of Irish Catholics don’t follow Church doctrine. Polls consistently show a majority of Irish people support abortion rights. The exposure of the Catholic Church’s tolerance of and defense of pedophiles in the 1990s also destroyed much of its moral authority. Overwhelming majorities support marriage for priests and the right for women to be priests.

Full article

26 Jan 2013

fuckyeahfeminists:

What is this I don’t even -

State legislators in Michigan held a hearing on Tuesday to consider House Bills 5684 and 5685, which would allow taxpayers to receive tax relief for unborn fetuses past 12 weeks’ gestation.

because fetus are more important than…

(Source: thinkprogress.org)

23 Jan 2013

thepeoplesrecord:

A protest has erupted in Amman, as decisions to raise gas prices by 30% have come into force at midnight tonight — an hour ago or so.

November 13, 2012

All evening, gas stations I walked past had perhaps 20+ cars queuing, trying to get a full tank before the price hike.

The protest I was just watching, by the Ministry of Interior roundabout, had a couple of hundred people but some very virulent anti-King Abdallah slogans. Including the quintessential “الشعب يريد إسقاط النظام”  The people demand the downfall of the regime. (yes, that sounds familiar doesn’t it).

Another slogan I thought was impressive: الحرية من الله غصب عنك عبد الله — (Freedom is from God whether you like it or not, Abdallah). Yet another called the King “the patron of corruption”.

After a good hour and a half the police – regular police, anti-riot police, plain-clothed, and even guys in camouflage uniform – went to break the protest, running after protesters with batons. No teargas in case you were wondering.

Below are a few of my photos from 1/2 hour ago. All are licensed under CC — feel free to use and share, with attribution. [Flickr set is here]

Source