The CFC

17 Mar 2013


olmecrecords:

The Jomon: the original inhabitants of Japan 


Anonymous tumblrer says this is actually “Tibetan nuns wearing wigs, taken by John Claude White in 1904.”

olmecrecords:

The Jomon: the original inhabitants of Japan 

Anonymous tumblrer says this is actually “Tibetan nuns wearing wigs, taken by John Claude White in 1904.”

10 Jan 2013

doveilmiosoldi:

here’s a roundup of the maps of “North American indigenous territories” I’ve seen on tumblr in the last two weeks. please note the following:

  1. save for the second one, none of them are dated. “pre-contact” is not a date. “colonial” is not a date. the first could mean 1500 or 1850 or anywhere in between. the latter could be any one of those dates, all the way up to the present. an ahistoric map is an uncontextualized map which means it is an essentially useless and ignorant map. 
  2. they all contradict each other. which one is right? they were all drawn by white academics, so it’s hard to really know, huh? 
  3. they all have major flaws and inaccuracies. there are at least 500 different tribes in N. America—none of these maps save the second to last one have that many listed, and that one is of Northern California alone! 

Academics and cartographers will lie to you and say that it’s hard to know which lands belonged to whom in the “pre-contact days.” This is a reflection of their unwillingness to dialogue with indigenous peoples and knowledges than it is actual existing information, because you can bet Native peoples know which land is theirs.

They’ll legitimate “estimations” and “generalizations” for the sake of “general knowledge” that “indigenous peoples were there.” That’s part of a larger colonial narrative that tells us it’s okay to belittle indigenous histories and knowledges for the sake of ignorance produced by that same colonial narrative. 

Finally, they’ll hide behind industry-granted authority grounded in objectivism—as if colonizers could ever be objective about the lands they’re colonizing. In the words of Fanon, “for the colonized person, objectivity is always turned against them.” This authority is granted by colonial institutions of power that actively works to the detriment of indigenous peoples and legitimates epistemic and material violence from academics and professionals. There is no such thing as objectivity, much less an objective map.

Aside from formal reservation boundaries, there are no maps in existence which adequately represent indigenous territories of North America (and even reservation boundaries are complicated and changing, and don’t include unrecognized tribes). What does indigenous territory mean? Is it legal landholdings? Cultural areas? Linguistic areas? Historic areas, and if so, from which time period? The only way to account for the multiple and varied iterations and meanings of “indigenous territories” is to create maps of extremely small areas, working from indigenous knowledges and histories. They would have to be something like 20x60mi on each page, and even then would require multiple iterations, taking historic change, varying definitions, and varying narratives into account (many boundaries are contested or overlap!). The final project would be a whole series of massive atlases. 

Maps are an assertion of power. Think carefully what kind of power you’re perpetuating when using maps like these. For more information and to see other posts I’ve written on the subject (including the use of generalization & linguistic area maps), see these posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 56, 7, 8.

14 May 2012

leonineantiheroine:

http://m.news.com.au/TopStories/pg/0/fi1171757.htm

A POLICE officer unleashed a series of savage blows to the head of a teenager bleeding from a bullet wound to the neck during a brutal arrest early yesterday.

Moments after he was pulled from a mangled car…

3 Nov 2011

SEWSA LOGO

SEWSA POC Caucus Call for Papers - Litanies of Survival from the Ivory Tower and Beyond- Due Nov. 15

This year, the former Women of Color Caucus renamed the People of Color (POC) Caucus of SEWSA invites papers, poems, performances, playlists, prescriptions, potions, procedures, and processes of surviving the academic industrial complex. How many women of color professors do you know who died before their 60th birthday? How many Queer POC scholars do you know who were denied advancement because of their politics? How many POC students do you know whose work was unfairly labeled “not rigorous” because it was accessible to those outside the academy? How many of us owe our survival to the women of color staff people who run our departments? We ask because we know that you know countless stories like these and we know that you’ve had these experiences too. As survivors ourselves, we ask how did we do it? How do we do it again? And how do we do it better? Please share with us your research and personal strategies of survival. “We were never meant to survive,” but we do!

Please email moyazb[at]gmail[dot]com with your submissions by Nov. 15 with “SEWSA POC” in the subject line. SEWSA will be held at George Mason University March 29-31, 2012.

We strongly encourage submissions from undergraduates, staff, administrators, and interested community members.

15 Oct 2011

knitmeapony:

selchieproductions:

Remember the Belo Monte dam that would flood a massive part of the Amazon Rain forest and that would force 40,000 indigenous Brazilians to leave their homelands and how everything seemed lost a while ago?
It’s not lost.
Amazon mega-dam halted© Survival International

A judge in Brazil has ordered that the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam in the Amazon be suspended, warning that it would disrupt fishing by the local population.
Thousands of Indians and many other communities living in the area around the Xingu river depend on fishing as a key element of their nutrition.
The judge has forbidden the consortium building the dam, Norte Energia S.A., from implementing ‘any works which will interfere with the natural course of the Xingu river’.
The consortium faces a daily fine of over US$100,000 if it does not comply with the ruling.
If built, Belo Monte would be the third largest dam in the world. As well as drastically affecting fish stocks, it would devastate vast areas of forest upon which thousands of indigenous people, includinguncontacted Indians, depend for their well-being.
Sheyla Juruna, of the Juruna tribe which will be affected by the dam, stated, ‘We consider the river our home. We do not want the dam, we do not want this destructive project… we want our rights upheld’.
The Indians have not given their consent for the dam to go ahead, and have warned that if it does, the Xingu could become a ‘river of blood’.
They have held numerous protests against Belo Monte. Last month, thousands of people took to the streets worldwide, calling on the Brazilian government to halt the dam. Survival supporters delivered letters to the Brazilian embassies in Berlin, London, Paris and Madrid expressing their concerns for the Indians.
The Brazilian government issued the construction license for the dam earlier this year, disregarding a request from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights that the licensing be suspended until the Indians’ rights are respected. 


FUCK yes.

knitmeapony:

selchieproductions:

Remember the Belo Monte dam that would flood a massive part of the Amazon Rain forest and that would force 40,000 indigenous Brazilians to leave their homelands and how everything seemed lost a while ago?

It’s not lost.

Amazon mega-dam halted
© Survival International

A judge in Brazil has ordered that the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam in the Amazon be suspended, warning that it would disrupt fishing by the local population.

Thousands of Indians and many other communities living in the area around the Xingu river depend on fishing as a key element of their nutrition.

The judge has forbidden the consortium building the dam, Norte Energia S.A., from implementing ‘any works which will interfere with the natural course of the Xingu river’.

The consortium faces a daily fine of over US$100,000 if it does not comply with the ruling.

If built, Belo Monte would be the third largest dam in the world. As well as drastically affecting fish stocks, it would devastate vast areas of forest upon which thousands of indigenous people, includinguncontacted Indians, depend for their well-being.

Sheyla Juruna, of the Juruna tribe which will be affected by the dam, stated, ‘We consider the river our home. We do not want the dam, we do not want this destructive project… we want our rights upheld’.

The Indians have not given their consent for the dam to go ahead, and have warned that if it does, the Xingu could become a ‘river of blood’.

They have held numerous protests against Belo Monte. Last month, thousands of people took to the streets worldwide, calling on the Brazilian government to halt the dam. Survival supporters delivered letters to the Brazilian embassies in Berlin, London, Paris and Madrid expressing their concerns for the Indians.

The Brazilian government issued the construction license for the dam earlier this year, disregarding a request from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights that the licensing be suspended until the Indians’ rights are respected. 

FUCK yes.